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BMAT Topics - Biomedical Admissions Test Updated: 2024

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Exam Code: BMAT Biomedical Admissions Test Topics January 2024 by Killexams.com team

BMAT Biomedical Admissions Test

Exam Details:
- Number of Questions: The BMAT (Biomedical Admissions Test) consists of three sections: Section 1 - Aptitude and Skills, Section 2 - Scientific Knowledge and Applications, and Section 3 - Writing Task. The number of questions in each section is as follows:
- Section 1: 35 multiple-choice questions
- Section 2: 27 multiple-choice questions
- Section 3: One writing task

- Time: The BMAT is a time-limited exam. The duration for each section is as follows:
- Section 1: 60 minutes
- Section 2: 30 minutes
- Section 3: 30 minutes

Course Outline:
The BMAT assesses a candidate's aptitude and knowledge in various areas relevant to the field of biomedical sciences. The exam is divided into three sections, each with its own focus and objectives:

1. Section 1 - Aptitude and Skills:
- Critical Thinking: Assessing the ability to analyze and evaluate information, identify assumptions, draw conclusions, and detect logical flaws.
- Problem Solving: Evaluating the candidate's skills in applying logic and reasoning to solve problems, including numerical and spatial reasoning.
- Data Analysis and Inference: Testing the ability to interpret data presented in various formats (tables, graphs, charts) and draw meaningful conclusions.

2. Section 2 - Scientific Knowledge and Applications:
- Biology: Assessing the candidate's knowledge of biological concepts, including molecular biology, genetics, cellular structure, physiology, and evolution.
- Chemistry: Evaluating the understanding of chemical principles, including atomic structure, bonding, periodic table, organic chemistry, and biochemistry.
- Physics and Mathematics: Testing knowledge and application of physics concepts, such as mechanics, thermodynamics, waves, and medical physics, as well as mathematical skills relevant to biomedical sciences.

3. Section 3 - Writing Task:
- Writing Skills: Evaluating the candidate's ability to communicate effectively in written form.
- Critical Analysis: Assessing the capacity to critically evaluate arguments, provide logical reasoning, and present coherent and well-structured responses.

Exam Objectives:
The objectives of the BMAT are as follows:

1. Assessing Aptitude and Skills: Evaluate the candidate's critical thinking, problem-solving, and data analysis abilities, which are important skills for success in biomedical sciences.

2. Testing Scientific Knowledge: Assess the candidate's knowledge and understanding of core scientific concepts in biology, chemistry, physics, and mathematics relevant to biomedical sciences.

3. Evaluating Writing Skills: Assess the candidate's ability to communicate effectively in writing and critically analyze arguments.

4. Predicting Potential for Success: The BMAT aims to provide admissions tutors with additional information beyond academic grades to predict a candidate's potential for success in biomedical education.

Exam Syllabus:
The specific syllabus for the BMAT is not released publicly, as the exam focuses on assessing general skills and knowledge applicable to biomedical sciences. However, it is recommended to familiarize yourself with the following topics:

- Section 1: Aptitude and Skills
- Critical thinking skills
- Problem-solving techniques
- Data analysis and inference

- Section 2: Scientific Knowledge and Applications
- Biology: Molecular biology, genetics, cellular structure, physiology, evolution
- Chemistry: Atomic structure, bonding, periodic table, organic chemistry, biochemistry
- Physics: Mechanics, thermodynamics, waves, medical physics
- Mathematics: Relevant mathematical concepts and calculations

- Section 3: Writing Task
- Essay writing skills
- Critical analysis and reasoning abilities

It is essential to review the official BMAT preparation materials and practice questions provided by the administering body to gain a comprehensive understanding of the exam structure and content.
Biomedical Admissions Test
Medical Biomedical Topics

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Biomedical Admissions Test
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Question: 58
A colloid made from a liquid dispersing medium and gas dispersed phase is called
what?
A. Aerosol
B. Emulsion
C. Sol
D. Solid Foam
E. Foam
Answer: E
Foams are colloids with a liquid dispersing medium and a gas dispersed phase.
An aerosol has a gas dispersing medium and dispersed phase. An emulsion has a
liquid dispersing medium and dispersed phase. A sol has a liquid dispersing
medium and a solid dispersed phase. A solid foam has a solid dispersed medium
and a gas dispersed phase.
Question: 59
Which of the following is not true about complex ions?
A. Complex ions are formed with a metal as the central atom
B. The other molecules that bond to the metal are called ligands
C. Ligands act as Lewis Acids
D. The coordination number of a complex ion refers to the number of bonds the
center atom forms
E. All of the above are true
Answer: C
Ligands, the compounds that bind to the central metal atom, always act as Lewis
Bases. Lewis Bases donate lone pairs of electrons to the Lewis Acid (the metal
ion). All other statements are true.
Question: 60
A fixed quantity of a gas undergoes a change in temperature from 100 K to 200 K
and a change in pressure from 2 atm to 1 atm. After theses changes, the volume of
the gas is
A. Half of the original volume
B. Unchanged
C. Twice the original volume
D. Four times the original volume
E. Eight times the original volume
Answer: D
The pressure, temperature, and volume of a gas are related by the ideal gas law,
PV=nRT. Solving for volume gives the equation V=(nRT/P). The molar quantity
of gas (n) is constant, so the equation reduces to V=T/P. In the context of the
question, temperature is doubled while pressure is halved, resulting in a four-fold
increase in volume.
Question: 61
When sodium acetate, NaCH3COO, is added to water the resulting solution is
basic. True or false?
A. True
B. False
Answer: A
The statement is true. In water, NaCH3COO forms Na+ and CH3CO ions. Na+ is
neutral, and does not affect the pH of the solution. CH3COO- is the conjugate
base of acetic acid, and reacts with water to form hydroxide ions. Therefore, the
resulting solution will be basic.
Question: 62
What do the letters in the S-T-A-R method of communication stand for?
A. Standard Target Acquisition Review
B. Situation, task, action, result
C. Start, train, act, review
D. Say it, try it, act on it, review it
E. They don’t actually stand for anything.
Answer: B
STAR stands for situation, task, action, result. S - Explain the situation. T -
Describe the task that needed to be completed. A - What action did you take? R -
Describe the result. For example: “I was brought in to lead a $1.5 million project
that was failing and management didn’t understand why. My task was to bring the
project back on schedule. To do this, I analyzed why the project had fallen behind
schedule and discovered the team was in a matrixed organization and the
operational processes were taking precedence over this project. To solve the
problem, I worked with functional managers to free up time for key resources.
The result was that we got the project turned around and delivered on schedule.
Furthermore, we won an additional $500,000 contract because the client went
from being dissatisfied to very happy.” Key Takeaway: STAR is an effective
technique to deliver a cohesive narrative of what you are doing or have done
Master it and you will win points in interviews and with senior managers. Have at
least 10 of these scenarios prepared. Try not to re-use any in one given day, no
matter how many interviews you have. At the end, people get together and
compare notes. Plus, in many cases, that perfect example you have won’t fit the
question that is asked. If someone asks you about a time you managed a team
through adversity, you can’t use your story about how you singlehandedly
increased earnings 20 percent while saving the CEO’s grandmother from a
burning house.
Question: 63
A princess who is severely allergic to certain frogs is confronted with the
possibility that her prince may be a frog. There are 3 frogs in front of her. She’s
not sure she’ll be allergic to the frog until she kisses it. One frog is definitely safe
to kiss. Should she kiss a frog and risk death?
A. Yes
B. No
C. Maybe
Answer: C
Maybe is the best choice here. This is a somewhat absurd question, but it’s one an
editor had in an interview. It is designed throw you off. The question is at the end
of the day about risk. Businesses must take risks to succeed. Princesses may have
to in order to find their Prince Charming. Key Takeaway: The interviewer is
really asking you to analyze the risk and determine if it is worth it. This is an easy
question if you do not panic. Maybe a quick Q&A could lead to an answer here,
or you can propose something out of the box to manage this risk, like a big box of
Benadryl.
Question: 64
How many molecules are in .275 grams of SO3?
A. 3.22x1020
B. 4.50x1021
C. 2.07x1021
D. 1.12x1020
E. 4.56x1022
Answer: C
Begin this problem by converting grams of SO3 to moles of SO3 using the molar
mass of SO3. Once you have obtained this value, use Avogadro’s number to
convert moles of SO3 to molecules of SO3. The final expression is (.275 grams
SO3) x (1 mol / 80.057 grams) x (6.022x1023 molecules / 1 mol), indicating that
the correct answer is 2.07x1021.
Question: 65
What volume of .250 M potassium hydroxide is needed to neutralize 1.25 liters of
.500 M hydrochloric acid?
A. 2.50 liters
B. 1.25 liters
C. .625 liters
D. .375 liters
E. 5.0 liters
Answer: A
Hydrochloric acid (HCl) is a strong, monoprotic acid. Potassium hydroxide
(KOH) is a strong base that contains one hydroxide anion per molecule. The
concentrations and volumes of these solutions are related by the formula
(Molarity1)(Volume1) = (Molarity2)(Volume2). Entering the variables into this
equation gives (.250 M)(Volume1) = (.500 M)(1.25 liters). Solve for Volume1 to
find the correct answer, 2.5 liters.
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Medical Biomedical Topics - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/BMAT Search results Medical Biomedical Topics - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/BMAT https://killexams.com/exam_list/Medical Biomedical & Nutritional Sciences Biomedical Sciences Freshman Seminar

Description

This course is intended to provide the student with an introduction to the professions available within the field of biomedical sciences. Topics include history of the profession, stat and federal laboratory regulations, professional organizations, ethics and professionalism, and an overview of each laboratory discipline. The role of the biomedical scientist in the clinical setting will be explored further through laboratory and industry tours.

Introduction to Laboratory Research

Description

This course prepares students in the Biomedical Sciences major for biomedical research. Students will learn basic and clinical research design and experimental aspects, applying critical thinking skills and engaging in outcome evaluation of research studies and quantitative data analysis and interpretation. Students will develop an understanding of the key differences between basic, clinical, and translational research and their implications and relation to diagnostic, treatment, and health management. The course will introduce students to literature review, identifying basic and key gaps and formulating key questions for scientific experimental pursuit. The course also reviews basic statistics research methods and the importance of significant statistical sampling.

Prerequisites

Junior Level or Higher or Permission of Instructor.

Clinical Molecular and Cell Biology I

Description

The course is designed to provide a foundation in Molecular Biology and will cover structure, function, and regulation of proteins and nucleic acids. Other topics will include transcription, translation, DNA replication, DNA repair, genomics, and proteomics. A significant portion of the course will be dedicated to molecular biology techniques used to study proteins and nucleic acids. Emphasis will be placed on the application of molecular biology in biomedical research and healthcare.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: HSCI.3500 Human Biochemistry, or CHEM.4500 Intro to Biochemistry, or BIOL.4190 Biochemisry, or Permission of Instructor.

Clinical Molecular and Cell Biology Laboratory I

Description

This laboratory course introduces basic molecular techniques and methodologies with hands-on experience. Starting with practices on information access from the NCBI databases, the students will learn techniques for proteins and nucleic acids extraction, quantification and separation, primer designs and PCR applications, gene cloning and expression, and principles of column chromatography for protein purification.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: HSCI.3500 Human Biochemistry, and MLSC.3630 Clinical Laboratory Instrumentation Laboratory, or Permission of Instructor.

Organic Structures and Reactions II

Description

This course presents fundamental principles of Organic Chemistry and chemical reactions not covered in Organic Structures and Reactions I, with continued emphasis on concepts most relevant to the health professions. More detailed structure-stability-reactivity relationships, stereochemical principles, and reaction mechanisms are presented, including many relevant examples of the applications of Organic Chemistry in drug design and synthesis, as well as its central role on metabolism and pharmacology. The course reviews and reinforces the sue of spectral techniques for the qualitative analysis of organic compounds and elucidation of chemical structures, with emphasis on infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: BMSC.2420 Organic Structures and Reactions I, and BMSC.2440 Organic Structures and Reactions Laboratory I, and Co-req: BMSC.3440 Organic Structures and Reactions Laboratory II.

Organic Structures and Reactions Laboratory II

Description

This course is designed to expose and train students interested in pursuing careers in health-related professions to more advanced laboratory techniques used in Organic Chemistry, building on the principles learned in organic structures and Reactions Laboratory I, including extraction, recrystallization, and chromatography. The synthesis, purification, and characterization of various classes of organic compounds will be carried out, including a multi-step synthesis. Laboratory experiments will be performed to exemplify and expand upon the principles covered in the Organic Structures and Reactions II lecture course.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: BMSC.2420 Organic Structures and Reactions I, and BMSC.2440 Organic Structures and Reactions Laboratory I, and Co-req: BMSC.3420 Organic Structures and Reactions II.

Biomedical Sciences Junior Seminar

Description

This course introduces students to contemporary biomedical research projects within the field of biomedical sciences. Students will attend research seminars organized by the Biomedical Sciences faculty and evaluate each presentation. Students will also develop interviewing skills and techniques for future employment and graduate school opportunities.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: Junior Level, Clinical Lab Science Major.

OMICS: Essentials and Applications

Description

This course is designed to introduce the current OMICS technologies and their practical applications in human health and living environments. It provides the essential knowledge to explore OMICS technologies on person medicine. OMICS are emerging technologies for understanding the diversity and distribution of living organisms and the behavior of cells, tissues, organs, and the whole organism at the molecular level using methods such as genomics, proteomics, systems biology, bioinformatics, as well as the computational tools needed to analyze and make sense of the data. Each of these OMICS topics will be covered by lectures for general overview and discussions on practical applications.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: BMSC.3220 Clinical Molecular and Cell Biology I, and BMSC.3240 Clinical Molecular and Cell Biology Lab I.

Clinical Molecular and Cell Biology II

Description

The course is designed to provide a foundation in cell biology and will primarily focus on essential structural components and organelles and their biological functions, as well as molecular signaling mechanisms underlying major cellular processes and intercellular communications. The course will also cover integration of cells into tissues, system cells, cell death, and cancer. Cell biology techniques will be studied and the application of cell biology in biomedical research and healthcare will be emphasized.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: BMSC.3220 Clinical Molecular & Cell Biology I, or Permission of Instructor.

Clinical Molecular and Cell Biology Laboratory II

Description

This laboratory course introduces basic cell biology techniques and methodologies with hands-on experience. The course will focus on practices of tissue culture, fluorescent labeling, membrane surface and intracellular protein visualization, microscopy, flow cytometry, posttranslational protein modification assays, ion channel functional assessment, cell signaling research methods, signaling pathway analysis and modeling disease conditions in cell lines.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: HSCI.3500 Human Biochemistry, and MLSC.3630 Clinical Laboratory Instrumentation Laboratory, or Permission of Instructor.

Advanced Biomedical Laboratory Techniques

Description

This advanced laboratory course is designed for students to reinforce and apply many of the concepts and hand-on laboratory techniques learned in all of the previous courses taken by Biomedical Sciences majors. Students will engage in a semester-long laboratory project or projects involving extensive hands-on experience, whose primary objective is to empower students with the necessary knowledge and experience to make them employable in their field of choice within the Biomedical Sciences upon graduation for the University.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: BMSC.4120 Clinical Mol. & Cell Biol. II, and BMSC.4140 Clinical Mol. & Cell Biol. Lab II, and Senior in Clinical Lab Sciences or Permission of instructor.

Clinical Laboratory Theory (Formerly 36.241)

Description

This course is designed to introduce the theoretical principles and applications of diagnostic techniques and the procedures of the clinical laboratory including phlebotomy. It will define and describe both qualitative and quantitative, manual and automated laboratory techniques, particularly in hematology.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: HSCI.1010 Anatomy & Physiology I, and Applied Biomedical (ABS), or Clinical Lab Sciences (CLS) BS only.

Clinical Laboratory Theory Lab (Formerly 36.243)

Description

A laboratory course designed to expose prospective clinical scientists to many of the essentialskills, methods, and procedures basic to professional performance in the clinical laboratory; to explain and demonstrate to students and have them perform these methods; to develop an understanding of these techniques and to provide a technical background, an approach to testing that the student can build upon and use in future courses.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: HSCI.1010 Human Anatomy & Physiology I, and Co-req: MLSC.2410 Clinical Laboratory Theory.

Medical Bacteriology I (Formerly 36.311/512)

Description

A study of the cultural, biochemical, genetic, serological and pathogenic characteristics of disease producing microorganisms. Emphasis will be placed on the pathophysiology of the infectious diseases and their relationship to isolation and identification of the pathogenic microorganisms.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: HSCI.2110 Basic Clinical Micro & Pathology, and HSCI.2130 Basic Clinical Micro & Pathology Lab, or BIOL.2010 General Microbiology, and BIOL.2030L General Microbiology Lab.

Medical Bacteriology Laboratory I (Formerly 36.313)

Description

This course is designed to introduce the student to pathogenic microorganisms, media and techniques used in the identification of these organisms. Emphasis will be based upon the isolation, identification and differentiation of pathogenic microorganisms common to man. In addition, quality control and antimicrobial susceptibility testing will be covered.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: HSCI.2110 Basic Lin Micro & Path, and HSCI.2130 Basic Clin Micro & Path Lab, or BIOL.2010 Gen Microbiology, and BIOL.2030L Gen Microbiology Lab, and Co-req: MLSC.3110 Medical Bacteriology.

Clinical Hematology Practicum (Formerly 36.420 and MLSC.4200)

Description

Supervised clinical training in an affiliated clinical laboratory. Designed to reinforce knowledge and skills gained in lecture and laboratory and at the same time introduce the student to the daily activities of a clinical hematology laboratory. Emphasis will be placed on quality control, methodology, and clinical interpretation and correlation.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: MLSC.3210 Clinical Hematology, and MLSC.3230 Clinical Hematology Lab, and Applied Biomedical Sciences (ABS), and MLS option only.

Clinical Hematology (Formerly 36.321)

Description

A study of the human hematopoietic system and its relationship to other organ systems. Discussions will include morphological and biochemical relationships of erythropoiesis and leukopoiesis in health and disease states. A study of the mechanics of blood coagulation as it relates to health and disease states will also be included.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: MLSC.2410 Clinical Lab Theory, and MLSC.2430 Clinical Lab Theory Lab, and Applied Biomedical Sciences (BS).

Clinical Hematology Laboratory (Formerly 36.323)

Description

This course is designed to emphasize current hematological and coagulation procedures used in today's clinical laboratory. The implications of these tests to diagnose, monitor and evaluate the various hematological disorders are also discussed.

Prerequisites

Co-req: MLSC.3210 Clinical Hematology, and Applied Biomedical Sciences (BS), and Medical Lab Science option.

Advanced Topics in Hemostasis (Formerly 36.434 and MLSC.4340)

Description

This course will constitute an in depth study of the hemostatic mechanism. Current research and case studies on the roles of vessel endothelium, platelet function, clotting procoagulants and fibrinolysis will be presented. Students will diagnose pathologic hemostatic states, such as hemorrhage or thrombophilia, due to deficiencies and impairments of these roles, including the impact of natural and acquired anticoagulants/inhibitors and anticoagulant therapy.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: MLSC.2410 Clinical Laboratory Theory.

Clinical Chemistry I (Formerly 36.351)

Description

This course is designed to provide students with knowledge and theory of techniques used in the Clinical Chemistry laboratory for measurement of aminoacids, proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids in body fluids. Students will learn to use, interpret and evaluate the performance of these laboratory methods and develop the ability to recognize levels of these biochemical components in both normal and pathophysiological states. Examination and comparison of laboratory results will be used to diagnose or rule out disease. Techniques reviewed range from general to specific assays and from the classical to state-of-the-art methodologies. In addition, students will be able to assess the quality of laboratory generated values determine when values are invalid and suggest ideas to troubleshoot clinical laboratory methods.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: BMSC.2420, or CHEM.2210, and HSCI.3500, or CHEM.4500, or BIOL.4190, and MLSC.3630, and Applied Biomedical Sciences (BS), or Clinical Lab Sciences (BS), or Nutritional Sciences (BS), or Pharmaceutical Sciences (BS).

Clinical Chemistry Laboratory I (Formerly 36.353)

Description

This course is designed to introduce the clinical techniques of biochemical measurement in body fluids. These techniques range from general to specific assays and from the classical to the upto- date state of the art methodologies. Biochemical measurements of the following in the normal state and alterations due to pathophysiology are discussed: amino acids, proteins, carbohydrates and lipids. Quality control of assay procedures is emphasized.

Prerequisites

Co-req: MLSC.3510 Clinical Chemistry, and Applied Biomedical Sciences (BS), or Clinical Lab Sciences (BS).

Clinical Laboratory Instrumentation (Formerly 36.361)

Description

This course is designed to provide an in-depth knowledge of clinical chemistry laboratory instrumentation. Emphasis is placed on theoretical concepts, instrument components and design, calibration and troubleshooting of modern instrumentation, and analytical methodologies in the clinical laboratory. Additionally, qualitative and quantitative applications of instrumental techniques are covered. Computer applications are included where appropriate. The following spectroscopic instruments are studied: ultraviolet, visible and infra red absorption, fluorescence, turbidimetry and nephelometry, reflectance, flame emission and atomic absorption spectroscopy. Electrochemical methods of analysis are reviewed, including potentiometric techniques, voltammetry and coulometry. Chromatographic instrumentation and methods are discussed, such as column and thin layer chromatography, high pressure liquid chromatography, gas chromatography, and ion exchange chromatography.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: HSCI.2520 Physiological Chemistry II, or CHEM.1220 Chemistry II, or CHEM.1120 General Chemistry II, and Academic Plan Clinical Lab Sciences(BS) or Nutritional Sciences (BS) only.

Clinical Laboratory Sciences Seminar (Formerly 36.373)

Description

This course is designed to familiarize the student with different interview skills and approaches to resume writing, the process of implementing a laboratory information system, good education practices and team building skills. Students will evaluate current research designs and work in a team to create a presentation to express their opinions as educated consumers.

Prerequisites

Academic Plan Clinical Lab Sciences (BS) or Nutritional Sciences (BS) only.

Molecular Diagnostics Laboratory

Description

The Molecular Diagnostics course is designed to instruct students in the principles and laboratory techniques used in Molecular Diagnostics in the clinical laboratory setting. An overview of nucleic acid structure, gene expression, and genetic diseases will be provided. Students will be given both lecture and laboratory instruction in basic molecular testing methodologies.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: HSCI.3500 Human Biochemistry, or Permission of Instructor.

Clinical Microbiology Practicum (Formerly 36.410)

Description

Supervised clinical training in an affiliated clinical laboratory, designed to reinforce knowledge and skills gained in lecture and laboratory and at the same time introduce the student to the daily activities of the clinical microbiology laboratory. Emphasis will be placed on quality control, methodology and clinical interpretation.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: MLSC.3110 Medical Bacteriology, or MLSC.5120 Medical Bacteriology, and MLSC.3130 Medical Bacteriology Lab, and Applied Biomedical Sciences (BS), and MLS option, or Clinical Laboratory Sciences (BS), and MLS Option.

Medical Mycology & Parasitology (Formerly 36.411)

Description

Intensive study of classification, morphology, physiology, genetics and ecology of medically important fungi and parasites. Emphasis on epidemiology, pathogenicity and diagnosis.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: MLSC.3110 Medical Bacteriology, or MLSC.5120 Medical Bacteriology, and MLSC.3130 Medical Bacteriology Lab, and Applied Biomedical Sciences (BS), or Clinical Laboratory Sciences (BS).

Medical Mycology & Parasitology Laboratory (Formerly 36.413)

Description

The laboratory is designed to emphasize principles and procedures used in the isolation, cultivation, and identification of medically important fungi and parasites.

Prerequisites

Co-req: MLCS.4110 Medical Mycology & Parasitology, or MLSC.6150 Medical Mycology & Parasitology, and Applied Biomedical Sciences (BS), and MLS Option, or Clinical Lab Sciences (BS), and MLS Option.

Clinical Virology/Serology Lab (Formerly 36.415)

Description

This course is designed to survey pathogenic viruses emphasizing diagnosis of disease. Evaluation of new technology and diagnostic tests with reference to diagnosis and prognosis of disease are examined. In addition, this course is designed to instruct students in the principles and techniques used in the clinical immunology/serology setting. Students will become proficient in laboratory techniques such as immunodiffusion, ELISA, hemagglutination, and neutralization techniques used for immunodiagnosis.. "

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: MLSC.3310 Clinical Immunology; Clinical Lab Sciences (BS).

Molecular Diagnostics Lab (Formerly 36.416)

Description

This course is designed to instruct students in the principles and techniques used in Molecular Diagnostics in the clinical laboratory setting. Students will be given both lecture and laboratory instruction in basic molecular testing methodologies. At the completion of this course, the student will have a basic understanding of molecular diagnostic principles and will be proficient in molecular diagnostic laboratory techniques including DNA extraction, PCR using SINEs and STRs, restriction enzyme digestion, ELISA, bacterial transformation, DNA sequencing and microarrays.

Prerequisites

Academic Plan Clinical Lab Sciences (BS) Only.

Medical Laboratory Science Senior Seminar

Description

This course is designed to familiarize the student with educational methodologies, teambuilding skills, and the principles and practices of research study design. Students will evaluate current research designs, and work in a team to create a presentation to express their opinions as educated laboratory consumers. In addition, this course will provide a review of the theoretical and practical knowledge required to successfully pass the ASCP Board of Certification Exam in Medical Laboratory Science. Case studies and different types of questions integrating all areas of the clinical laboratory will be utilized to review the important topics in each discipline.

Prerequisites

Applied Biomedical Sciences (BS), and MLS Option, or Clinical Lab Sciences (BS), and MLS Option.

Clinical Immunohematology Practicum (Formerly 36.430)

Description

Supervised clinical training in an affiliated clinical laboratory is designed to reinforce knowledgeand skills gained in lecture and laboratory and, at the same time, introduce the student to thedaily activities of the clinical immunohematology laboratory. Emphasis will be placed on quality control, methodology and clinical interpretation and correlation.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: MLSC.4310 or MLSC.4310 Clinical Immunohematology, and MLSC.4330 Clinical Immunohematology Lab, and Applied Biomedical Sciences (BS).

Clinical Immunohematology (Formerly 36.431)

Description

Lecture and case study discussions look at the major red cell antigen/antibody systems that are of importance in understanding transfusion therapies, blood antigen and antiody testing, compatibility testing, and pathological diseases. Emphasis is on differentiation and clinical significance of each system. Donor selection regulations, component preparation, adverse transfusion reactions, and hematherapy will also be discussed.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: MLSC.3210 Clinical Hematology, and BMSC.3310 Clinical Immunology, and Applied Biomedical Sciences (ABS) majors only.

Clinical Immunohematology Laboratory (Formerly 36.433)

Description

Practical laboratory experience in blood banking, illustrating the concepts stressed in the lecture including ABO and Rh typing,identification of other red cell antigens, antibody screening and identification, direct antiglobulin testing, crossmatching, and other techniques performed in the Clinical Immunohematology laboratory.

Prerequisites

Co-req: MLSC.4310 Clinical Immunohematology, or MLSC.5310 Clinical Immunohematology, and Applied Biomedical Sciences (ABS) majors and MLS option only.

Clinical Chemistry Practicum (Formerly 36.450)

Description

Supervised clinical training in an affiliated hospital clinical laboratory. Designed to reinforce knowledge and skills gained in lecture and laboratory and at the same time introduce the student to the daily activities of the clinical laboratory. Emphasis will be placed on quality control,methodology and clinical interpretation and correlation.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: MLSC.4520 Clinical Chemistry II, and MLSC.4540 Clinical Chemistry II Lab, and Applied Biomedical Sciences (BS): Medical Lab Science option.

Urinalysis Practicum (Formerly 36.451)

Description

A one-week clinical rotation in an affiliated laboratory designed to give the student experience in microscopic examination and evaluation of urine sediments. Emphasis is on correlating physical and chemical characteristics with sediment evaluation and diagnoses as well as on quality control, methodology, and clinical interpretation and correlation. Additional routine tests of a physical and chemical nature will be performed and demonstrated.

Prerequisites

Co-req: MLSC.4520 Clinical Chemistry II, and MLSC.4540 Clinical Chemistry II Lab, and Applied Biomedical Sciences (BS).

Clinical Chemistry II (Formerly 36.452)

Description

This course will provide students with knowledge and theory of techniques associated with determinants of acid-base balance, blood gases, electrolytes, osmolality, hemoglobin, toxicology, therapeutic drug monitoring and endocrinology. Students learn to interpret and evaluate the performance of these laboratory methods and develop the ability to recognize levels of these biochemical components in both normal and pathophysiological states. Laboratory techniques range from general to specific assays and from the classical to state-of-the-art methodologies. In addition, students will be able to assess the quality and validity of laboratory generated values, determine when values are invalid and suggest ideas to troubleshoot methodologies. Students will also be able to produce and analyze statistical data for use in correlation, comparison and evaluation of laboratory techniques. Prerequisite: 35.351

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: 36.351 Clinical Chemistry I.

Laboratory Management and Ethics (Formerly 36.453)

Description

This course will acquaint the student with the many managerial, educational, technical, and administrative theories and practices, as well as moral and ethical issues that may confront the health care professional functioning within a clinical or research laboratory setting. In addition, it will present the varied career opportunities that are available for graduates.

Prerequisites

Applied Biomedical Sciences (ABS) major, CS and MLS options, or Permission of Instructor.

Clinical Chemistry Laboratory II (Formerly 36.454)

Description

This course, a continuation of MLSC.3530, is designed to instruct the student in the analytical procedures and methods currently used in the clinical laboratory. Manual and automated methods utilized in the assessment of such topics as acid-base balance, porphyrins, toxicology and vitamins will be introduced. In addition, methods associated with the routine examinations of urine and other body fluids will be introduced. Quality control, laboratory safety and professional performance are emphasized.

Prerequisites

Co-req: MLSC.4520 Clinical Chemistry II, and Applied Biomedical Sciences (BS) majors only.

Clinical Virology

Description

This course is designed to introduce the student to the field of Clinical Virology. Viral structures, physiology,and pathogenesis will be discussed. Emphasis will be placed on viral diseases and the laboratory techniques used to identify them.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: HSCI.3500 Human Biochemistry, or Permission of Instructor.

Senior Seminar (Formerly 36.474)

Description

This course is designed to familiarize the student with different types of questions used in the national certification exams and to give the student the opportunity to practice taking mock certification examinations.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: Clinical Lab Sciences (BS) or Medical Lab Science Option only.

Nutrition and Wellness (Formerly 35.210 and NUTR.2100))

Description

This course is an introductory course to the science of nutrition as it applies to everyday life and health. Focus will include the six major nutrients: carbohydrates, lipids (fats), protein, vitamins, minerals, and water and their importance in the human body. Digestion, absorption, and metabolism in the human body will be introduced. The course will also examine energy balance and weight management as they relate to nutrition and fitness. The impact of culture, demographics and ethnicity on nutritional intake will be discussed. Students will explore the relationship between nutrition and health through laboratory experiences. Students should not be taking NUTR.1100 if they already took NUTR.2060.

Introduction to Nutritional Science(Formerly 35.205)

Description

This course introduces students to the major in Nutritional Science. Objectives of the major are covered along with beginning nutritional and food science principles, history of the profession, career options, and legal aspects of practice as a nutrition educator. An integrated survey of nutrition science as it relates to human physiological chemistry, food chemistry and biochemistry will also be discussed. This course will include guest speakers from within the department and outside the university. This course will be restricted to nutritional science majors.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: Nutritional Sciences majors only. Permission number required.

Human Nutrition(Formerly 35.206)

Description

This course provides an overview of nutrition and the components of a nutritious diet during the various stages of the life cycle. It emphasizes the impact of nutrition on the major contemporary health problems in the United States. Nutrition issues, trends and research, and their effect on society and the legislative process will be explored.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: HSCI.1020 Anatomy & Physiology II, or BIOL.1120 Principles of Biology II, or Permission of instructor.

Introduction to Food Safety

Description

This course focuses on food safety from a 'farm to fork' perspective. The class will cover a comprehensive overview of the food safety system addressing the biological, chemical and physical agents with emphasis on domestic food-borne outbreaks, public health significance, disease control, and the microbial spoilage of foods. The history and fundamental principles of food safety will be addressed including the risk and hazard analysis of different foods and the important advances in food system that are necessary for controlling hazards in the modern food industry.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: BS in Nutritional Science (Major or Minor), or (MPH in Dietetics or Nutrition).

Food Science with Lab

Description

This course explores the basic principles of food science such as: food preparation, food ingredients and food preservation, regulatory agencies and food regulations, and concepts that relate to food safety, recipe alteration and menu design. The laboratory component demonstrates and illustrates the chemical and physical properties of foods including the effects of processing, ingredients, and storage on food quality and nutrient retention.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: Nutritional Sciences majors only. Permission number required.

Practice of Nutrition Professional (Formerly NUTR.4310)

Description

This course provides students with the knowledge and application of the skills of the dietetics professional and the governance of nutrition and dietetics practice. Student will learn the importance of quality management of food and nutrition services and the management theories and business principles required to deliver programs and services. Students will also learn the fundamentals of public policy. This course will have an emphasis on preparing the student for supervised practice necessary for a career as a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: NUTR.2060 Human Nutrition.

Life Cycle Nutrition (Formerly 36.336)

Description

Biology of the life cycle including development, growth, maturation, and aging and its impact on nutritional requirements of humans from the zygote to the elderly is considered. How to meet these nutritional requirements is discussed relative to the feeding issues and context of each major life stage. Course emphasizes the critical analyses of beneficial and adverse outcomes of various nutrient intakes and dietary patterns of the nutritional status and well-being through integration of nutrition and other health sciences in understanding nutritional needs during the life cycle. Analysis of cultural, environmental, psychosocial, physical, and economic factors affecting nutritional status through the life span will also be discusses. Methods of nutritional assessment for each stage of the life cycle will be examined.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: NUTR.2060 Human Nutrition or HSCI.2060 Human Nutrition.

Community Nutrition (Formerly 36.345)

Description

This course explores the role of the nutrition professional in community needs assessment, intervention development and evaluation, and in forming domestic nutrition policy. Nutrition problems in contemporary communities and of selected target groups in the United States and in developing countries are examined. Programs and strategies to meet nutrition needs outside the acute care setting, such as nutrition education and food assistance are explored. Local, state,and national nutrition policy and initiatives in nutrition will also be examined. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA) and Social Responsibility & Ethics (SRE).

Prerequisites

Pre-req: NUTR.2060 Human Nutrition.

Sports Nutrition (Formerly 35.207)

Description

This course enables students to learn and apply the fundamentals of nutrition in maximizing athletic performance. This course will reinforce knowledge of the digestion and metabolism of macro- and micronutrients. Students will be able to describe the role of sports-enhancing practices including hydration, fueling, supplementation and use of ergogenic aids. Contemporary topics in nutrition and fitness will be discussed.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: NUTR.2060 Human Nutrition, and Nutritional Science, or Exercise Science major, or Permission of Instructor.

Nutrition and Metabolism(Formerly 36.371)

Description

This class is advancement into the biochemical and physiologic process through which the nourishment of the human organism is accomplished and how the interactions among nutrients, other aspects of the environment, and the body result in perturbations affecting human health. The process of human nourishment proceeds within the context of an organism with an intricate structure, unique composition, and specific capacities for adaptive change. Basic information from many disciplines relating to body function and structure will be summarized. This will serve as setting the stage for detailed discussions, which describe the nutritional biochemistry and metabolism of the body for the normal state, and for states where nutrient availability is altered of disease is imposed. Prerequisites: 35.206

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: NUTR.2060 Human Nutrition or HSCI.2060 Human Nutrition.

Body Diversity and Health (Formerly 36.372)

Description

This class will advance the understanding of prevention and treatment of chronic diseases where body size is a significant risk factor. A comprehensive overview of the physiological and social determinants of energy balance will be provided. Methods to complete nutrition assessments and deliver culturally sensitive and unbiased interventions will be reviewed. Evidence based individual and population level strategies that promote healthy habits, a positive body image, and eliminates health disparities will be compared and contrasted to scientifically unsupported approaches.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: NUTR.2060 Human Nutrition or HSCI.2060 Human Nutrition.

Biochemistry of Lipids(Formerly 36.406)

Description

This advanced course in the nutritional biochemistry and physiology of lipids will detail the role of lipids in the normal and pathological processes at both the cellular and whole organism level. Topics will range from general discussions of the digestion, absorption and transport of lipids to the role of eicosanoids and lipid soluble antioxidants during normal and diseased states, such as atherosclerosis, diabetes and hypertension. Subject matter will also include a discussion of the various interventions for the prevention and treatment of certain of these disease states. There will also be discussion of the current issues in lipid nutrition.

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: NUTR 2060 Human Nutrition, HSCI 3500 Human Biochemistry.

Practice of the Nutritional Professional II

Description

This course in a continuation of Practice of the Nutrition Professional I. This course provides advanced study in professional nutrition settings that will prepare students for the professional work environment. Concepts related to Ethics, cultural competency, communication, professional development, interprofessional education, and leadership will be emphasized. Sites where students will participate in experiential learning include organizations that provide nutrition education, counseling, and services for various life cycle stages such as food pantries, YMCA's, hospitals assisted living facilities, schools, fitness centers, and after-school programs.

Prerequisites

Senior Status, and Dietetics Sub-plans only.

Vitamins and Minerals(Formerly 36.463)

Description

Detailed analysis of the digestion, absorption, transport, and intermediary metabolism of vitamins and minerals as essential nutrients. The chemical and biochemical characteristics of vitamins and minerals are examined to account for the physiological functions.

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: NUTR 2060 Human Nutrition, HSCI 3500 Human Biochemistry.

Lab Methods in Nutrition Assessment (Formerly 36.465/565)

Description

This course provides the student the the opportunity to assess nutritional status using several modern analytical methods. The course uses spectrophotometry, HPLC and automated procedures to assess the status of vitamins, lipids, iron, glucose, and insulin. The student will learn the mathematical calculations needed for the methods. This course enables the student to appreciate how nutrient analysis is designed and implemented in the analytical laboratory.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: MLSC 3630 Clin. Lab. Inst. Lab.

Nutrigenetics (Formerly 36.472)

Description

Regulation of eukaryotic gene expression by specific nutrients, hormones, and metabolites will be discussed including transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and translational mechanisms with emphasis on disease development or prevention. Application of material will include determining how human dietary requirements are affected by gene variants and inherited biochemical characteristics. This course will enable students to link their knowledge of nutrition with the growing discipline of the effects of diet on the human genome and specific hereditary diseases.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: NUTR.2060 Human Nutrition, and NUTR.4630 Vitamins and Minerals, or Permission of Instructor.

Medical Nutrition Therapy I(Formerly 36.481)

Description

This course is intended to provide students with current knowledge and application in dietary prevention, treatment, and long-term management of obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and upper gastrointestinal diseases. Topics include nutrition counseling and communication skills, professional ethics, medical terminology, clinical laboratory values, dietary menu planning and analysis in specific situations, evaluating nutritional status, case studies for these diseases. This course will stress the steps in the nutrition care process, determine appropriate methods for screening patients for nutritional risk, and help the student assess the nutritional status of patients.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: NUTR.2060 Human Nutrition or HSCI.2060 Human Nutrition.

Medical Nutrition Therapy II(Formerly 36.482)

Description

This course is a continuation of Medical Nutrition Therapy I that will provide students with current knowledge and application in dietary prevention, treatment, and long-term management of patients with trauma, burns, HIV, cancer, liver, lower gastrointestinal diseases, celiac disease, and renal diseases. Topics include nutrition counseling and communication skills, professional ethics, medical terminology, clinical laboratory values, dietary menu planning and analysis in specific situations, evaluating nutritional status, case studies for these diseases, and will examine enteral and parental nutrition support for critically ill patients. Students will also develop a basic knowledge related tot the principles of fluid and electrolytes balance as well as acid-base balance as they relate to the nutritional care of patients/clients.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: 36.481 Medical Nutrition Therapy I

Senior Research in Nutrition I

Description

Senior Research in Nutrition I will introduce concepts and application of research through critical exploration of the research process, research methodology, and ethics. Students will begin to critically review literature relevant to their field or interests and practice written scientific communication skills related to research.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: Senior Status, Nutrition Science Majors only.

Directed Research in Nutrition(Formerly 36.494)

Description

Students with their faculty advisor structure a research project in the area of nutrition. A paper embodying the results of the project will be prepared.

Prerequisites

Academic Sub-Plan Nutrition only.

Senior Research in Nutrition(Formerly 36.496)

Description

Continuation of 36.494. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Applied & Integrative Learning (AIL), Information Literacy (IL), and Written & Oral Communication (WOC).

Fri, 04 Aug 2023 07:40:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.uml.edu/Catalog/Undergraduate/Health-Sciences/Departments/biomedical-nutritional/Course-listing.aspx
Course Listing for Biomedical & Nutritional Sciences Medical Bacteriology I (Formerly 36.311/512)

Description

A study of the cultural, biochemical, genetic, serological and pathogenic characteristics of disease producing microorganisms. Emphasis will be placed on the pathophysiology of the infectious diseases and their relationship to isolation and identification of the pathogenic microorganisms.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: HSCI.2110 Basic Clinical Micro & Pathology, and HSCI.2130 Basic Clinical Micro & Pathology Lab, or BIOL.2010 General Microbiology, and BIOL.2030L General Microbiology Lab.

Clinical Immunohematology (Formerly 36.531)

Description

Lecture and case study discussions look at the major red cell antigen/antibody systems that are of importance in understanding transfusion therapies, compatibility testing, and pathological diseases. Emphasis is on differentiation and clinical significance of each system. Donor selection regulations, component preparation, and hematherapy will also be discussed. Students will be required to do a presentation, poster, and paper on an advanced topic in Clinical Immunohematology.

Prerequisites

Students in Clin Lab Sci (MS); or Grad Certs in Clinical Pathology, Nutritional Sci, or Public Health Lab Sci; or permission of Instructor.

Introduction to Public Health and the Public Health Laboratory (Formerly 36.541)

Description

This course is designed to provide an overview of public health and the public heath laborabory covering topics such as the legal basis and history of public health, public health structure, communications and interactions, and epidemiology. Emphasis will be placed on the role of the public health laboratory and its core functions, its role in policy development, infectious disease, environmental issues, emergency preparedness, newborn screening, global issues, and public health research. Public health laboratory methodology, regulation and improvement, and quality assurance will also be examined.

Prerequisites

Students in Clin Lab Sci (MS); or Grad Certs in Clinical Pathology, Nutritional Sci, or Public Health Lab Sci; or permission of Instructor.

Foundations of Biomedical Research

Description

This course prepares graduate students in the MS in Clinical Laboratory Science for biomedical research. Students will learn clinical and basic research design and experimental aspects through applying critical thinking skills and engaging in outcome evaluation of research studies and quantitative data analysis and interpretation. Students will develop an understanding of the key differences between clinical, translational and basic research and their implications and relation to diagnostic, treatment and health management. The course will introduce students to literature review, identifying basic and key gaps and formulating key questions for scientific experimental pursuit. The course also reviews basic statistics research methods, including statistical significance.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: MS in CLS, Clinical Pathology certificate, or permission of Instructor.

Advanced Pathophysiology (Formerly 36.551)

Description

Disease processes as appropriate and inappropriate as variants of normal physiological functions. A detailed examination of certain important and illustrative diseases rather than a survey of diseases in general.

Prerequisites

Students in Clin Lab Sci (MS); or Grad Certs in Clinical Pathology, Nutritional Sci, or Public Health Lab Sci; or permission of Instructor.

Emerging Topics in Clinical Chemistry (Formerly 36.553)

Description

This course is designed to give an in-depth understanding in clinical chemistry. Topics include: analytical techniques and the selection of methodologies. The course allows for a detailed examination and discussion of selected articles from the Journal of Clinical Chemistry.

Prerequisites

Students in Clin Lab Sci (MS); or Grad Certs in Clinical Pathology, Nutritional Sci, or Public Health Lab Sci; or Coordinator permission.

Molecular Pathology (Formerly 36.560)

Description

This graduate course is designed to study the molecular aspects of disease. Applications and techniques utilized in the field of molecular pathology are emphasized. This course is intended to provide students with information required to understand the increasing role of molecular pathology in the daily practice and management of chronic disease in medicine. Major emphasis on strength and limitations of clinical diagnostics technologies and their utilization in these applications are presented. This course will also provide a review of current molecular pathology literature and principles as they relate to specific organ systems.

Emerging Topics in Clinical Chemistry

Description

This course will provide an advanced perspective on the discipline of clinical chemistry. In depth discussions of new discoveries in clinical chemistry biomarkers, new understanding of disease pathogenesis as they pertain to clinical chemistry will be pursued in this course. System and disease-based approaches to clinical chemistry analytical methods will be used to discuss emerging challenges and opportunities in the field, including analytical challenges. Emphasis will also be placed on theoretical concepts of clinical chemistry instrumentation, including components and design of modern instrumentation and analytical methodologies. The course will also discuss the role of the clinical chemist in ensuring that testing performed in clinical trials meets the highest standards and provides meaningful data.

Topics in Clinical Laboratory Science I (Formerly 36.575)

Description

This course provides students with the knowledge that is fundamentally necessary to understand the routine operations of the clinical diagnostic laboratory. The course will familiarize students with the diagnostic application of the most current testing methodologies and also provide a forum to discuss and critically review primary literature pertinent to current clinical laboratory issues.

Prerequisites

Students in Clin Lab Sci (MS); or Grad Certs in Clinical Pathology, Nutritional Sci, or Public Health Lab Sci; or Coordinator permission.

Clinical Applications of Molecular Genetics (Formerly 36.580)

Description

The course starts with tissue sampling methods and basic DNA dynamics. Genetic technologies such as RFLP analysis, PCR, gene profiling and expression analysis, gene chips, FISH, and epigenetic analysis are covered. More advanced genetic techniques include Next Generation Sequencing of genomes and exomes, as well as metabolomics, and transcriptome analysis. CRISPR-cas9 is described in fine detail, and its potential use in all areas of gene editing is presented. Somatic vs. germline gene therapy techniques are compared in efficacy to CRISPR. In utero treatments by CRISPR and SLENDR are analyzed. Other topics include chromosome analysis, cancer genetics and cytogenetics, stem cells, cloning, and optogenetics. The genomic level of analysis is pervasive in the course.

Biomarker Discovery & Applications

Description

This course will cover the burgeoning field of biomarkers research, with a special focus on biomedical and clinical applications. The course is organized in three main sections: (I) Biomarker discovery and validation, including types of biomarkers and platforms for discovery (proteomics, metabolomics, multiplex technologies); (II) biomarker applications in clinical and health research; and (III) new frontiers in biomarkers research. Examples of biomarker applications will include organ systems, disciplines (clinical lab sciences and clinical trials, environmental health, toxic tort and forensic litigation), and regulatory perspectives.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: MS in CLS, Clinical Pathology certificate, or permission of Instructor.

Biomarkers Discovery and Application Lab

Description

This course provides hands-on laboratory experience that will illustrate and enhance critical concepts related to biomarker discovery and validation. Techniques will include LC-ESI-MS/MS and multiplexing technologies for biomarker analysis in human biological samples, including urine, and blood.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: MS in CLS, Clinical Pathology certificate, or permission of Instructor.

Clinical Toxicology

Description

Clinical toxicology traditionally studied the toxic effects of therapeutic agents - substances intended to treat orameliorate disease. Modern clinical toxicology has a broader scope: to examine complex toxicological events that result from the interaction of toxins with normal physiology, including therapeutics, drugs, natural poisons and inadvertent chemical exposures, as well as the clinical management of toxicity. The course places special emphasis on the temporality of events, from the developments of signs, to symptoms, to pathology. Analytical tools, such as mass spectrometry, needed to measure toxins and their metabolic byproducts in biological fluids of living organisms are discussed.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: MS in CLS, Clinical Pathology certificate, or permission of Instructor.

Clinical Toxicology Lab

Description

This course provides hands-on laboratory experience that will illustrate and enhance critical concepts related to clinical toxicology. Techniques will include immunoassay, advanced spectroscopy techniques and emerging technologies for toxicology analysis in human biological samples, including urine, and blood.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: MS in CLS, Clinical Pathology certificate, or permission of Instructor.

Infectious Disease (Formerly 36.613)

Description

This course is designed for graduate students in the health sciences focusing on the pathophysiology of infectious disease. Major infectious organisms will be discussed as biological models and presented in the way they affect major systems of the body. Emphasis will be placed on journal readings describing significant episodes of emerging infections and current technology in diagnosis and treatment of infectious diseases.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: MS in CLS, Clinical Pathology certificate, or permission of Instructor.

Medical Mycology and Parasitology (Formerly 36.615)

Description

This course is designed to instruct students in diagnostic medical mycology and parasitology. Diseases, specimen collection and handling, laboratory identification and treatment of medically significant fungi and parasites will be studied. Discussion of AIDS related infections and prophylactic treatment will be evaluated. Life cycles of parasites, prevention and environmental protection plans will be analyzed.

Prerequisites

Students in Clin Lab Sci (MS); or Grad Certs in Clinical Pathology, Nutritional Sci, or Public Health Lab Sci; or permission of Instructor.

Quality Assurance, Control and Improvement in the Clinical and Public Health Lab (Formerly 36.640)

Description

This course is designed to provide an overview of total quality management issues in the Clinical and Public Health laboratory. Topics presented will include CLIA and quality control in the laboratory, clinical and public health laboratory QC calculations, charts and graphs, regulations involving new control lots, out-of-control QC situations, method comparison, instrument validation, and quality assurance. Emphasis will be placed on meeting all federal regulations including the FDA, state regulations, as well as meeting professional agency regulations such as JCAHO, CAP, and APHL.

Prerequisites

Students in Clin Lab Sci (MS); or Grad Certs in Clinical Pathology, Nutritional Sci, or Public Health Lab Sci; or Coordinator permission.

Graduate Project - Clinical Laboratory Sciences (Formerly 36.733)

Description

An independent study or laboratory project which has been approved and is under the direction of the project advisor. Projects are approved by the graduate coordinator in conjunction with the project advisor.

Graduate Project - Clinical Laboratory Sciences (Formerly 36.734)

Description

An independent study or laboratory project which has been approved and is under the direction of the project advisor. Projects are approved by the graduate coordinator in conjunction with the project advisor.

Master's Thesis - Clinical Lab Sciences (Formerly 36.743)

Description

Analytical and/or experimental work conducted under the direction of a thesis advisor and in accordance to the Graduate School Guidelines. Students are required to submit a written proposal for approval by a thesis committee and to present an oral defense at a college seminar.

Master's Thesis - Clinical Laboratory Science (Formerly 36.744)

Description

Research Design and Methodology. Analytical and/or experimental work conducted under the direction of a thesis advisor and in accordance to the Graduate School Guidelines. Students are required to submit a written proposal for approval by a thesis committee and to present an oral defense at a college seminar.

Doctoral Research (Formerly 36.753)

Description

There is currently no description available for this course.

Doctoral Research (Formerly 36.756)

Description

There is currently no description available for this course.

Doctoral Research (Formerly 36.759)

Description

There is currently no description available for this course.

Biochemistry of Lipids(Formerly 36.506)

Description

This advanced course in the nutritional biochemistr and physiology of lipids will detail the role of lipids in the normal and pathological processes at both the cellular and whole organism level. Topics will range from general discussions of the digestion, absorption and transport of lipids to the role of eicosanoids and lipid soluble anti-oxidants during normal and diseased states, such as atherosclerosis, diabetes and hypertension. Subject matter will also include a discussion of the various interventions for the prevention and treatment of certain of these disease states. There will also be discussion of the current issues in lipid nutrition.

Vitamins and Minerals(Formerly 36.563)

Description

Provides a foundation for understanding the role of vitamins and minerals in human nutrition. Emphasis is placed on their roles in human biochemistry and physiology. The mechanism of action for each nutrient is examined. The course will explore the effects of nutrient deficiency, and identify the best dietary sources for each vitamin and mineral.

Lab Methods in Nutrition Assessment (Formerly 36.465/565)

Description

This course provides the student the the opportunity to assess nutritional status using several modern analytical methods. The course uses spectrophotometry, HPLC and automated procedures to assess the status of vitamins, lipids, iron, glucose, and insulin. The student will learn the mathematical calculations needed for the methods. This course enables the student to appreciate how nutrient analysis is designed and implemented in the analytical laboratory.

Nutrigenetics (Formerly 36.572)

Description

Regulation of eukaryotic gene expression by specific nutrients, hormones, and metabolites will be discussed including transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and translational mechanisms with n emphasis on disease development or prevention. Application of material will include determining how human dietary requirements are affected by gene variants and inherited biochemical characteristics. This course will enable students to link their knowledge of nutrition with the growing discipline of the effects of diet on the human genome and specific hereditary diseases.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: NUTR.3710 Nutrition and Metabolism, and NUTR.4630 Vitamins and Minerals, or NUTR.5630 Vitamins and Minerals.

Public Health Nutrition Practice

Description

This course provides advanced study in public health and community nutrition. Concepts related to cultural competency, public health and nutrition policy, health promotion, and the nutrition care process will be learned through lectures, quest lectures, in-class activities, case studies, and peer-led discussions. Students will have the opportunity to practice skills in community and public health nutrition settings such as food pantries and senior nutrition centers.

Nutrition Assessment(Formerly 36.601)

Description

This course provides an overview of tools used to assess nutritional health, dietary adequacy, dietary variety, and food security. Lectures and lab will be integrated together to demonstrate and provide experience in methods needed to assess, screen, and monitor physiological and dietary indictors of nutritional health. There will be an emphasis on methods and tools for assessing body composition, biochemical indicators, dietary intake, energy expenditure, and physical activity. Students will learn how to select and apply these methods in community, clinical and research settings and determine the strengths and limitations of each assessment tool.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PB-MPH Graduate Major or by permission.

Community Based Interventions (Formerly 36.602)

Description

This course will examine a broad range of community-based research and programs within the United States. Strategies for effective community-engagement and programming planning, implementation and evaluation will be discussed. Specific attention will be given to cultural tailoring of interventions. Students will engage in experiential learning and will work in teams to write a community funding proposal. Students will be required to present their funding proposal to a community panel. Field visits will allow students to interact with and learn from public health experts.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: NUTR.6000 Public Health Nutrition Practice & MPH Public Health-MPH Graduate Students only or by permission of instructor.

Global Nutrition(Formerly 36.603)

Description

This course is an examination of the food and nutrition issues around the world. The impact of food production and food intake on the environment and global nature of our food systems will be reviewed. The course will also include consideration of specific nutrient deficiencies, as well as nutrition-related aspects of infectious and chronic disease along with the programs and resources available to combat malnutrition for children and adults worldwide.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: 36.602 Public Health Nutrition and PB-MPH Graduate major or by permission.

Nutrition Epidemiology (Formerly 36.604)

Description

This course is designed for graduate students who are interested in conducting or better interpreting epidemiologic studies relating diet and nutrition status to disease and health. There is an increasing awareness that various aspects of diet and nutrition may be important contributing factors in chronic disease. There are many important problems, however, in the implementation and interpretation of these studies. The purpose of this course is to examine methodologies used in nutritional epidemiologic studies in lecture and lab sittings, and to review the current state of knowledge regarding diet and other nutritional indicators as an etiologic factor in disease.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PUBH 5750 Intro to Biostatistics and Epideminology, and PUBH 5770 Biostatics for Health Data, and PB-MPH Graduate Major or by permission.

Food and Nutrition Management

Description

This course provides advanced study in food and nutrition management principles. Topics include management theory, personnel selection, training, evaluation, organizational behavior, communication, governmental influences, labor management relations, marketing, and budgeting. This course requires group work, development of a business plan, and completion of management related case studies.

Advanced Clinical Nutrition

Description

This course provides advanced study in clinical nutrition. Topics include the nutrition care process, standardized language and documentation, evidence-based practice, confidentiality of medical records, JCAHO regulations, and coding and billing. Case studies will be completed to review and advanced learning about medical nutrition therapy for acute and chronic nutrition-related diseases. As part of this course, students will practice providing nutrition assessment, counseling, education, professional documentation, and evaluation in clinical nutrition settings.

Community Nutrition Supervised Practice

Description

This supervised practice experience is the application of knowledge and skills in community and public health nutrition. Students will practice nutrition assessment, nutrition counseling, and nutrition education for a wide range of populations at high nutritional risk. Students will develop cultural awareness and skills in cultural competency.

Food and Nutrition Management Supervised Practice

Description

This supervised practice experience is the application of knowledge and skills in food and nutrition management. There will be hands-on experience in human resource and financial management. Management skills specific to the food service industry, including management functions related to safety, security and sanitation, will also be incorporated. Students will also be able to apply knowledge in food production, distribution, and food service systems along with skills in menu planning. There will be an emphasis on using strategies to reduce waste and protect the environment.

Clinical Nutrition Supervised Practice

Description

This supervised practice experience is the application of knowledge and skills in clinical nutrition. Students will receive hands-on experience in nutrition assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of nutrition-related diseases while using skills in nutrition counseling and applying principles from behavior change theories. Students will be able to practice documentation of nutrition care and participate as members of an interdisciplinary team.

Mon, 17 Sep 2018 16:15:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.uml.edu/Catalog/Graduate/Health-Sciences/biomedical-nutritional/Course-listing.aspx
Medical Devices and Technologies—Graduate Certificate

“Examples of wearable medical devices and sensors beyond smart watches include hearing aids, insulin pumps, devices for respiratory therapy and sleep apnea, non-invasive ventilation devices, continuous glucose monitoring devices, blood pressure monitors, cardiac and heart rate monitors, and wearable pulse oximeters.”Michigan Tech Global Campus, Enhancing Wearable Tech

Tue, 08 Dec 2020 06:44:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.mtu.edu/biomedical/graduate/certificates/medical-devices/
Biomedical Engineering for Global Health No result found, try new keyword!George Truskey, Biomedical Engineering, Duke University 'This outstanding book by Professor Rebecca Richards-Kortum on bioengineering and world health is based on her years of pioneering work and ... Sun, 13 Aug 2023 13:05:00 -0500 https://www.cambridge.org/us/universitypress/subjects/engineering/biomedical-engineering/biomedical-engineering-global-health?format=HB NIBIB Releases 2023 Research Highlighting Biomedical Imaging Advances

The National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) released its Year in Review, the institute’s top science news of 2023. One review section — Biomedical Imaging Advances — discusses topics including combining ultrasound with artificial intelligence (AI) for cancer detection, an MRI contrast agent that targets hypoxic disease and a helmet with sensors to record brain function.

Also included is an interview between NIBIB and Maryellen Giger, PhD, a professor of radiology at the University of Chicago and the lead contact researcher, about how the Medical Imaging and Data Resource Center (MIDRC) can be used to develop and evaluate AI algorithms. MIDRC has collected images from nearly 55,000 patients, which has helped to create 27 in-house algorithms for the detection, diagnosis, monitoring and prognosis of COVID-19. MIDRC is co-led by investigators from the American College of Radiology® (ACR®), American Association of Physicists in Medicine and the Radiological Society of North America.

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) also recently released its 2023 Research Highlights, divided into three categories: Human Health Advances, Promising Medical Findings and Basic Research Insights.

ACR will continue to advocate for NIH and biomedical research agencies throughout 2024 to ensure discoveries and research progress.

For more information, contact Katie Grady, ACR Government Affairs Director.


Thu, 04 Jan 2024 03:19:00 -0600 text/html https://www.acr.org/Advocacy-and-Economics/Advocacy-News/Advocacy-News-Issues/In-the-Jan-6-2024-Issue/NIBIB-Releases-2023-Research-Highlighting-Biomedical-Imaging-Advances
Ozempic, Wegovy not associated with higher risk of suicidal ideation in large review of US health records No result found, try new keyword!Use of the medicine semaglutide for weight loss or type 2 diabetes wasn’t associated with a higher risk of suicidal ideation than other medicines for those conditions in a large new review of US ... Thu, 04 Jan 2024 20:00:27 -0600 en-us text/html https://www.msn.com/ Biomedical Science BSc (Hons)

Year 1

Year 1 provides students with the fundamental framework of biomedical science in human health.

  • Block 1: Professional & Practical Skills
  • Block 2: Chemistry & Biochemistry
  • Block 3: Anatomy & Physiology
  • Block 4: Microbiology

Year 2

Building on the topics from first year, in second year students start to appreciate the deeper complexities of biomedical science, exploring state-of-the-art research techniques and the role of biomedical science in diagnosis, preventing, and treating disease.

  • Block 1: Genetics & Molecular Pathology
  • Block 2: Emerging Techniques
  • Block 3: Organ Systems Physiology
  • Block 4: Human Health & Immunity

Optional Sandwich Placement Year

Students may apply for a supervised placement in a clinical, industry, or research laboratory, to gain valuable work experience, or (clinical labs only) to complete their IBMS training portfolio to become eligible for later HCPC registration.

Third Year

In third year, modules are designed in line with the clinical specialties of biomedical science laboratories, allowing students to combine and apply their knowledge with real-world relevance.

  • Block 1: Research Projects
  • Block 2: Blood Science
  • Block 3: Infection & Immunity Sciences
  • Block 4: Cell Sciences

Teaching

You will benefit from teaching methods including:

  • Lectures
  • Tutorials
  • Seminars
  • Computer-based learning
  • Extensive laboratory-based work

Each module will be taught over a 7-week period, allowing you to focus on one topic at a time, before building on the next topic sequentially.

Each module will include its own schedule of taught sessions including lectures, tutorials, and workshops, practical sessions in the lab, and time for your own independent study.

Assessment

Each topic or module will have a main assessment at the end of the module block. Assessments are based on real-world application of your skills, to try and best prepare you for the world of work, and include portfolios, presentations, case studies, lab reports, research papers, as well as quizzes and exams.

Programme Study

The accredited programme of study is usually taken over three years with an opportunity to spend an additional year (between years 2 and 3) either in industry or in an NHS laboratory.

Students pursue their own research interests in a final year project working closely with staff at the university, or out on project placements, for example in local hospital laboratories.

A subsequent MSc in Advanced Biomedical Science programme is available for BSc graduates or for experienced biomedical scientists covering major pathology specialities who require a postgraduate qualification for career advancement.

Teaching Hours

Contact hours in a typical week will depend to some extent on the optional modules you choose to study. However, typically you will have up to 20 contact hours of teaching and this will break down as:

Personal tutorial/small group teaching: approx. 6 hours of tutorials (or later in the year, project supervision) each week.

Medium group teaching: approx. 6 hours of practical classes, workshops or seminars each week.

Large group teaching: approx. 8 hours of lectures each week.

Personal study: approx. 15 hours studying and revising in your own time each week, including some guided study using hand-outs, online activities, etc.

Academic expertise 

The Biomedical Science BSc programme has a large and diversely skilled teaching team, whose expertise spans all areas of biomedical science. Specialist areas of research expertise include cancer, immunology, genetics, toxicology, microbiology, chemical synthesis and drug design, musculoskeletal biology and medical physics. Staff are very research active, which directly informs many aspects of your teaching at UG and PG level. 

Accreditation 

The Biomedical Science BSc programme is accredited by the Institute of Biomedical Science.

IBMSlogo

Wed, 18 Jan 2023 19:08:00 -0600 en-GB text/html https://www.dmu.ac.uk/study/courses/undergraduate-courses/biomedical-science-bsc-hons-degree/biomedical-science-bsc-hons.aspx
Enhancing Reproducibility in Biomedical Research through Harmonization of Guidelines for Transparent Reporting: A Workshop No result found, try new keyword!and health-related challenges facing society. Whether as a sponsor or donor, a member or volunteer, or an employee or fellow, you can make a difference. Sharing knowledge is what drives scientific ... Mon, 03 Aug 2020 03:39:00 -0500 text/html https://www.nationalacademies.org/our-work/enhancing-reproducibility-in-biomedical-research-through-harmonization-of-guidelines-for-transparent-reporting-a-workshop Third medical school for Hong Kong: a boost for biomedical hub ambitions, but will it ease shortage of doctors? No result found, try new keyword!Do you have questions about the biggest topics and trends from around the ... specialising in disciplines such as medicine, public health, biomedical sciences, nursing, traditional Chinese ... Tue, 21 Nov 2023 10:00:00 -0600 en-us text/html https://www.msn.com/ Biomedical Technology Veteran Mike Hess Joins IEEE Pulse as Editor-in-Chief No result found, try new keyword!IEEE, the world's largest technical professional organization dedicated to advancing technology for humanity, and the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBS), today announced the ... Wed, 03 Jan 2024 01:44:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.tmcnet.com/usubmit/2024/01/03/9939739.htm




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